Posts Tagged ‘London’

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An order of tea and WHOOP-ASS! “Welcome to the Punch”

January 12, 2014

Welcome To The Punch

There is a lot to thank the UK for—James Bond, Doctor Who, Thandie Newton—but their most recent contribution to the Western world has to be the revival of the totally-unironic tough-cop genre. TV shows like Luther and movies like Welcome to the Punch feature totally absurd action setpieces and the hoariest of cop-movie clichés, all played totally straight. It’s as if the British crime thriller has finally caught up to Tango and Cash. These stories aren’t good by any stretch of the imagination, but they do have a retro charm—something on full display with Punch.
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Bob Hoskins pwns! “The Long Good Friday”

January 19, 2011

The Long Good Friday begins with Harold Shand (Bob Hoskins) swaggering off a Concorde and through Heathrow Airport with the arrogance of a lion inspecting its patch of the Serengeti (or wherever lions live) while a ‘70s-era saxophones wail on the soundtrack. The jazz might as well be Harold’s own personal theme music, since, as we quickly learn, he came up hard in the underworld of the London docks, defeated all contenders, built a criminal empire, and is now poised to make a killing developing the very docks Harold tamed. He wears a perfectly-tailored, cream-colored suit; keeps with a beautiful, intelligent mistress (Helen Mirren); and splits his time between his penthouse apartment and yacht moored on the Thames. Harold, if anyone, deserves wah-wah saxophones playing while he walks. The Long Good Friday is about the 48 hours in his life in which he tears it all down. It’s a great movie—one which secures Bob Hoskins in the pantheon of brilliant actors—and it more than deserves its place as my 300th post.
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Adventures at the Center of the Universe: “Dear Galileo”

July 26, 2009

dear_galileo_poster6Nithiwat Tharathorn’s film Dear Galileo is a surprisingly effective coming-of-age story, which crackles with such realism that it puts most American movies about teenagers to shame. Galileo is also a road movie, and a buddy movie along with a coming-of-age story, and while it hits familiar beats, it never seems derivative or false. Anchored by two exceptional performances, the movie is never less than watchable, and often times genuinely affecting.
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